Monday, December 3, 2012

You Can't Out Exercise A Bad Diet.







Over my years of teaching classes and training clients, I discovered a lot of people think that if they exercise extra hard or long, they can burn off a bad day of overeating. This may be the reason behind the proliferation of extreme exercise classes. Let me reassure you; that plan does not work that well and could potentially injure you.

Calories in-Calories out
It comes down to this, If you take in 2,800 calories and your daily caloric expenditure is 1,800 calories, you are going to gain weight. So let's say you want to burn off that 1,000 calorie surplus; you are going to have to exercise hard for at least for 1.5 hours or more. And even then, you are just breaking even. In that case, if you overeat daily, you would end up not gaining your weight but maintaining your current weight. I see this a lot at the gym -- people who have been working out for years but are staying the same. Of course, they are better off than not exercising at all and it has helped keep them in good health. But if the goal is to lose weight, then one needs to rethink his or her plan.

Extreme Exercise Injuries
You have heard of the extreme exercise classes, such as Cross Fit or the DVD's like Insanity. Many doctors are seeing injuries especially from those who are new to exercise or won't change their nutrition, but are still looking for results. Here is a story that was reported in the Columbus Dispatch:


Dr. Jason Dapore of OhioHealth’s Spine, Sport & Joint Center said he has seen several patients with injuries related to these workouts, including damage to rotator cuffs, tendinitis in the knee and neck injuries.

“It’s not something they talk about in the commercials,” said Dapore, who has done the original P90X and is working his way through the second incarnation. “There are some dynamic, complex moves.”

The programs, which are on DVDs, run for a set number of days and include difficult aerobic and strength-training workouts.

Dapore said the newest version includes information about injury risks, but he thinks many people likely jump past the warnings in their eagerness to get going.

“I think people kind of just dive into their workouts,” he said.

Dapore said he also has noticed that many people who follow the P90X exercise program don’t adhere to the diet that goes with it. Without the proper diet, working out at that intensity can be dangerous, he said. “You’re basically tearing up your muscles and not getting the nutrition you need.”

People — especially those who aren’t in their 20s anymore — should take the time to learn about what the programs entail and talk to their doctor or a physical therapist about whether they are a safe option, Dapore said.    http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2012/03/25/health/intense-dvd-workouts-can-lead-to-injuries.html

When I teach my bootcamp class, there is always a warm-up of a least 5 minutes; special attention is paid to the shoulder area. When someone is out of breath and can no longer perform, I just don't yell at them to keep going. During workout sessions, a good fitness leader should be able to assess the needs of their students and push or pull back accordingly. I also know they are not going to lose weight unless they change their eating habits. And all the extreme moves won't really make a difference in the long run. This is something I preach in my classes.

Food for Thought
I started my fitness career in the mid-1980s while pursuing my Master Degree in Exercise Physiologyat Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana. Back then, many of my mentors were teaching high impact aerobics in church basements and in facilities with cement floor. Some of my colleagues were extreme runners who would participate in over 5 marathons a year. Most of my zealous friends and mentors have had knee and hip replacements. Now that I am older and wiser, I pepper my workouts with modified extreme workouts. The magic trick, however, is in the maximum 1 hour duration of the workout intensity -- including weights and cardio routines. Of course, no physically noticeable results will come of it if I fail to incorporate a healthful eating plan, which I do!

What have been some of your own experiences over extreme workouts to attempt to fix bad wellness habits in record time?


23 comments:

  1. you are totally right but the problem is...food is so delicious! Sigh, everything in moderation, and keep those calorie counts under control!
    sarah hirsch

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  2. Sarah you are right food is so tasty especially the fatty kind LOL.

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  3. I am in that high impact in the basement church group who now moved onto insanity and try to do double sessions if I over eat...I know exactly what you mean!
    ..3 of my boys are wrestlers and they eat healthier than the vast majority of people I have ever met, if they could somehow package their will power and exercise motivation they would be rich!
    i am your newest follower from the hop..pls follow back if you can.

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  4. momto8blog, I will check you out tomorrow, Thanks for stopping by.

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  5. I have been trying to lose weight since having my second child 2 years ago - with not great results! I love food, and I don't like exercise at all. Plus, having two babes under 4 was incredibly difficult to find time to exercise (I know, you make time for what is important). Recently I started writing down everything I am eating, and have found it extremely helpful in jump starting my weight loss. I think that those crazy exercise regimens can work for a short period, but eventually you get burnt out and just stop everything.

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  6. Heather with 2 babies under 4 you are plenty busy, for sure. Try out a couple of my home workouts, when you get the chance.

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  7. This is SO true, and such a great reminder this holiday season!! I am very guilty of trying to burn off the goodies this time of year. I guess nothing works as well as stepping away from the cookies!!

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  8. You are on point with this one Frugal Exerciser!!!! Diet is key and there is no way around it:)

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  9. Good points. Except many people exercise so that they can eat what they want. I am one of those! I am not really over weight, although I would like to lose 5 pounds. So I exercise - not so I can eat everything I want, but so I can have a glass of wine or a piece of chocolate and not worry. Everything in moderation right?

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  10. I eat healthy, but I also allow myself occasional treats. I am also lucky that my genetics are similar to my dads, he has always been very thin even though he eats a ton :)

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  11. Jennifer you are right. I'm speaking of those who practice exercise bulimia or are confused about why they can lose weight.

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  12. Frugal in WV you are like my husband but now that he is a little older, he has to be careful. However, he is not like the rest of the population LOL. I envy you guys.

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  13. I've always eaten healthy and taken my vitamins, however, it's only in the past few years that I've come to understand how important my diet is for my fitness. I finally dropped the wheat for good, and I feel so much better when I run.

    Thank you for linking up to Motivation Monday! I've learned so much from your posts. Please let me know if you're ever interested in doing a guest post for the New Year.

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  14. Thanks Barb,
    I will get something for you for January.

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  15. Wow, this is interesting! Many of us are mislead into believing you could eat whatever you want, just exercise it off. Thanks for the eye-opener. I will check the rest of your site to see how I could live a much healthier life :)

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  16. I used to think the erroneous way of 'I can work off these 5 slices of pizza' later. It doesn't help with conflicting reports out there that you can eat whatever you want, just exercise harder later.

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  17. I am so guilty of this faulty mindset. It's prevalent because we love to eat fatty (but yummy) foods and we rationalize us doing so by thinking we can just 'work it off.'

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  18. I am so guilty of this faulty mindset. It's prevalent because we love to eat fatty (but yummy) foods and we rationalize us doing so by thinking we can just 'work it off.'

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  19. This is so ture. I think sometimes we talk ourselves into eating that extra helping by thinking, I will just workout a little harder or longer. It doesn't work.

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  20. Sista Voyage and Tammy S, we all do this especially this time of the year.

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  21. This is so true! When I was younger I could run six miles a day and eat like crap, but now, even that ain't cutting it! I have to eat properly too!

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  22. I know this and I know it's all totally true, but for some reason I struggle to stick to the proper diet and nutrition.

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  23. This is an easy one. I've injured myself four times with extreme workouts. Each injury has taken me months to recover. Hopefully I've finally learnt my lesson. I like the idea of modified extreme workouts.

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